Historical Fatties!

Fat positive, Historically accurate, All around awesome


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Reblogged from historicalfatties
thewomanofkleenex:

historicalfatties:

Ariadne Oliver! My favorite Agatha Christie character. She is described as handsome, large, fat, a hotheaded feminist, and she’s a very successful mystery author (with a Finnish detective. So yes, a bit of a stand in for Christie herself!) Mrs. Oliver drives an impractical sexy sports car, she has a history of breaking delicate porch furniture by sitting on it, and is addicted to apples. She’s always surrounded by apples! In fact, the scene which inspired this drawing has her dresses to the nines in a lovely new dress… with a chunk of apple core on the bow. Yes, she eats apples all the time, but not in that “ooo look at the gross fatty stuffing her face” way. It’s funny, and endearing, and she’s a wonderful character. Who happens to be fat.
In fact, when I was watching an episode of Poirot on TV featuring Zoe Wannamaker as Mrs. Oliver and complained they cast a thin woman my mom was surprised Ariadne Oliver is distinctly described as fat in the books. We’ve both read a ton of Christie, but my Mom didn’t recall that Ariadne is not just tall, she is fat.
We’re so used to endearing, memorable and well written main characters being thin. But sometimes they aren’t. And I will forever love Christie for first introducing Mrs. oliver with the adjective “handsome.” Before ever referring to her (in the mouth of another character) as fat.

This would make a great Halloween costume. I should bookmark for future, because I think I could find a pattern to be adapted to such a dress.

Hiya! I was actually Ariadne Oliver for Halloween last year! I wore a forties-ish tweed skirt and cardigan (since she’s in several books, over several decades, and goes from town to country!) I carried a bag of apples and a book which I’d made to look like one of hers. I think it was “The Affair of the Second Goldfish” which is referenced in “Cards on the Table.”. I do hope you make a lovely dress for yourself!

thewomanofkleenex:

historicalfatties:

Ariadne Oliver! My favorite Agatha Christie character. She is described as handsome, large, fat, a hotheaded feminist, and she’s a very successful mystery author (with a Finnish detective. So yes, a bit of a stand in for Christie herself!)
Mrs. Oliver drives an impractical sexy sports car, she has a history of breaking delicate porch furniture by sitting on it, and is addicted to apples. She’s always surrounded by apples! In fact, the scene which inspired this drawing has her dresses to the nines in a lovely new dress… with a chunk of apple core on the bow.
Yes, she eats apples all the time, but not in that “ooo look at the gross fatty stuffing her face” way. It’s funny, and endearing, and she’s a wonderful character. Who happens to be fat.

In fact, when I was watching an episode of Poirot on TV featuring Zoe Wannamaker as Mrs. Oliver and complained they cast a thin woman my mom was surprised Ariadne Oliver is distinctly described as fat in the books. We’ve both read a ton of Christie, but my Mom didn’t recall that Ariadne is not just tall, she is fat.

We’re so used to endearing, memorable and well written main characters being thin. But sometimes they aren’t. And I will forever love Christie for first introducing Mrs. oliver with the adjective “handsome.” Before ever referring to her (in the mouth of another character) as fat.

This would make a great Halloween costume. I should bookmark for future, because I think I could find a pattern to be adapted to such a dress.

Hiya! I was actually Ariadne Oliver for Halloween last year! I wore a forties-ish tweed skirt and cardigan (since she’s in several books, over several decades, and goes from town to country!) I carried a bag of apples and a book which I’d made to look like one of hers. I think it was “The Affair of the Second Goldfish” which is referenced in “Cards on the Table.”. I do hope you make a lovely dress for yourself!

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Ariadne Oliver! My favorite Agatha Christie character.  She is described as handsome, large, fat, a hotheaded feminist, and she’s a very successful mystery author (with a Finnish detective. So yes, a bit of a stand in for Christie herself!)
Mrs. Oliver drives an impractical sexy sports car, she has a history of breaking delicate porch furniture by sitting on it, and is addicted to apples. She’s always surrounded by apples! In fact, the scene which inspired this drawing has her dresses to the nines in a lovely new dress… with a chunk of apple core on the bow.
Yes, she eats apples all the time, but not in that “ooo look at the gross fatty stuffing her face” way. It’s funny, and endearing, and she’s a wonderful character. Who happens to be fat.

In fact, when I was watching an episode of Poirot on TV featuring Zoe Wannamaker as Mrs. Oliver and complained they cast a thin woman my mom was surprised Ariadne Oliver is distinctly described as fat in the books. We’ve both read a ton of Christie, but my Mom didn’t recall that Ariadne is not just tall, she is fat.

We’re so used to endearing, memorable and well written main characters being thin. But sometimes they aren’t. And I will forever love Christie for first introducing Mrs. oliver with the adjective “handsome.” Before ever referring to her (in the mouth of another character) as fat.

Ariadne Oliver! My favorite Agatha Christie character. She is described as handsome, large, fat, a hotheaded feminist, and she’s a very successful mystery author (with a Finnish detective. So yes, a bit of a stand in for Christie herself!)
Mrs. Oliver drives an impractical sexy sports car, she has a history of breaking delicate porch furniture by sitting on it, and is addicted to apples. She’s always surrounded by apples! In fact, the scene which inspired this drawing has her dresses to the nines in a lovely new dress… with a chunk of apple core on the bow.
Yes, she eats apples all the time, but not in that “ooo look at the gross fatty stuffing her face” way. It’s funny, and endearing, and she’s a wonderful character. Who happens to be fat.

In fact, when I was watching an episode of Poirot on TV featuring Zoe Wannamaker as Mrs. Oliver and complained they cast a thin woman my mom was surprised Ariadne Oliver is distinctly described as fat in the books. We’ve both read a ton of Christie, but my Mom didn’t recall that Ariadne is not just tall, she is fat.

We’re so used to endearing, memorable and well written main characters being thin. But sometimes they aren’t. And I will forever love Christie for first introducing Mrs. oliver with the adjective “handsome.” Before ever referring to her (in the mouth of another character) as fat.

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Reblogged from in-edible
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Life is stern and life is earnest and life is so very busy right now! And this week, I do promise, there will be new historical fatties to look at! Spoiler alert- probably Etruscan and Roman, because that was the research I was doing this weekend!

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scrapofsassafras said: "Natural form" silhouette (mermaid) was the late 1870's and maybe one year into the 1880's, not primarily during the 1880's. Just thought you should know :)

Ah thank you so so much! I was just working from memory on that one, didn’t have a source image or date.

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Another train doodle! This one a late 40s evening gown.  Not gonna lie, I was listening to the Evita soundtrack on my way home from work on Friday, and drew this while thinking about the huge puffy white gown Eva wears while singing “Don’t Cry for Me, Argentina.”

Another train doodle! This one a late 40s evening gown. Not gonna lie, I was listening to the Evita soundtrack on my way home from work on Friday, and drew this while thinking about the huge puffy white gown Eva wears while singing “Don’t Cry for Me, Argentina.”

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A little train doodle, along with an apology for lack of updates! Been very busy lately.

But here’s a nice lady c. 1911, in a walking suit.  The leisured classes changed clothes a remarkable number of times over the course of the day between about 1850 and 1920. Clothes for hanging out in your room before you were really up, clothes for the morning, for going visiting, for receiving visitors, for riding a horse, for riding in a car, for walking, for afternoon, for dinner, for a ball, for the theater… it must have been exhausting!

A little train doodle, along with an apology for lack of updates! Been very busy lately.

But here’s a nice lady c. 1911, in a walking suit. The leisured classes changed clothes a remarkable number of times over the course of the day between about 1850 and 1920. Clothes for hanging out in your room before you were really up, clothes for the morning, for going visiting, for receiving visitors, for riding a horse, for riding in a car, for walking, for afternoon, for dinner, for a ball, for the theater… it must have been exhausting!

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Just a line drawing, but a lovely fatty nonetheless!  Last week was the week of my hands hating me, first my left wrist then my right hand decided to stop working properly.  But I’m back to ship shape and Bristol fashion, as it were.
This lovely lady is sporting a fashion stylish in the oughts of the last century, c 1900 to 1905.  The drooping bodice is the “pouter pigeon” style, since it looks a bit like a bird’s chest.  The feminine ideal in this period was more mature and a bit curvier than the decades preceding.  It’s like the young and lovely popular ideal of womanhood from the 1880s and 90s grew up into the mature lady of 1900.  Of course, curvy means hourglass shaped, there’s not many examples around of fat women wearing this style, in photographs or paintings.  
Throughout history fat women have been the subject of a lot of vitriol about “unflattering” (biggest scare quotes in the world!) styles of clothing.  Which is cruel on so many levels when fashions were so rigid and dressmakers were basically only making what was stylish.  Especially for evening wear - fat women had two choices.  Be made fun of for showing your arms/bosom, or be made fun of for looking frumpy and unstylish.
Clearly, you can be fat, stylish, and awesome.  
Oh also? Someday I desperately want to make an outfit like this for myself.  The skirt is all pintucked at the waist, so pretty!  
ink on watercolor paper, 2013 Anne Lillian

Just a line drawing, but a lovely fatty nonetheless!  Last week was the week of my hands hating me, first my left wrist then my right hand decided to stop working properly.  But I’m back to ship shape and Bristol fashion, as it were.

This lovely lady is sporting a fashion stylish in the oughts of the last century, c 1900 to 1905.  The drooping bodice is the “pouter pigeon” style, since it looks a bit like a bird’s chest.  The feminine ideal in this period was more mature and a bit curvier than the decades preceding.  It’s like the young and lovely popular ideal of womanhood from the 1880s and 90s grew up into the mature lady of 1900.  Of course, curvy means hourglass shaped, there’s not many examples around of fat women wearing this style, in photographs or paintings.  

Throughout history fat women have been the subject of a lot of vitriol about “unflattering” (biggest scare quotes in the world!) styles of clothing.  Which is cruel on so many levels when fashions were so rigid and dressmakers were basically only making what was stylish.  Especially for evening wear - fat women had two choices.  Be made fun of for showing your arms/bosom, or be made fun of for looking frumpy and unstylish.

Clearly, you can be fat, stylish, and awesome.  

Oh also? Someday I desperately want to make an outfit like this for myself.  The skirt is all pintucked at the waist, so pretty!  

ink on watercolor paper, 2013 Anne Lillian

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So here’s an ancient doodle of a flapper I drew on a bus once. New finished painted fatties are coming soon, I promise! I sprained my wrist this weekend though, and drawing with one hand proved surprisingly difficult. So I gave up!

So here’s an ancient doodle of a flapper I drew on a bus once. New finished painted fatties are coming soon, I promise! I sprained my wrist this weekend though, and drawing with one hand proved surprisingly difficult. So I gave up!

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Bustle dress!  The bustle went through three phases, and this mermaid style was the middle bit, when suddenly the butts got totally flat and there was no reason other than I guess women were sick of not being able to sit comfortably on chairs :)  This style was totally marketed to slender figures.  If you weren’t a slimmish hourglass, you didn’t rock the princess gown, or you risked being made fun of by basically everyone.  
Which, of course, means it’s doubly important to translate this into a historical fatty!  Fight the system, even if the system is from the eighteen eighties.
Watercolor and ink, 2013 Anne Lillian

Bustle dress!  The bustle went through three phases, and this mermaid style was the middle bit, when suddenly the butts got totally flat and there was no reason other than I guess women were sick of not being able to sit comfortably on chairs :)  This style was totally marketed to slender figures.  If you weren’t a slimmish hourglass, you didn’t rock the princess gown, or you risked being made fun of by basically everyone. 

Which, of course, means it’s doubly important to translate this into a historical fatty!  Fight the system, even if the system is from the eighteen eighties.

Watercolor and ink, 2013 Anne Lillian